Journal

A collection of architecture from around the world, curated by Eva Sopeoglou.

Cabins around the world

A summer weekend cabin is a holiday staple for Scandinavians, unlike Greeks, and examples of tiny vacation cabins feature from across the world.  Of course, the best designs are those that negotiate their spaces between inside and outside, and those which masterfully embrace the natural elements.

Progressive Prefabs of Jean Prouvé

Jean Prouvé’s architectural vision reached the masses through pre-fabrication. Together with his brother, Prouve set up a workshop which patented, among others, vacation cabins and permanent residences made of metal. The architect also carefully considered the climate – the Maison Tropicale, designed for the African continent allows for cross-ventilation and thermal stack-effect ventilation through the walls, small openings and roof.    

Filtered daylight and the sense of outdoor living

This building is contained within a tight and solid envelope, however, because of the modular nature of the brick material used, and a few openings to the sky, it allows the sunlight to be filtered and washed on its interior walls. The result is a feeling of interior space while still perceiving the outside environment.

Outdoor meeting place

The New York version of an open-air room is James Turrell’s installation Meeting at MoMA PS1. The chosen materials invoke a historic interior, while a generous opening to the exterior sky transforms it into a semi-outdoor courtyard space, a conversation room, where everybody registers the temprerature change.

Anna Heringer, Julien Lanoo · China Bamboo Hostels

Beautifully crafted buildings are carefully placed in the natural environment. They are inspired by local traditional ceramic vessels. Anna Heringer adds architectural value in remote locations of the planet, her work makes sensitive use of local building techniques and traditional craft materials.

Cabin in the Woods

“This architect built his home in a beautiful Norwegian Forest”: The Norwegian version of The Olive Tree House is surrounded by nature. Note that the small scale of the house is designed with body-conscious detailing, for example, it is full of small seating areas and nooks that enhance ones sense of inhabitation.    

Halle Commune – Pleyel Bridge by OMA

“A bridge is a bridge is a bridge… Or, is it?” Could this proposal by OMA, for a bridge-building-city which extends over a train tracks in Paris’ St Denis suburb, inspire a Univ. of Herts campus extension that would unite the two campuses (De Havillant and College Lane) currently divided by the A1 motorway?    …

Semi-outdoor configurations and the small details

This house design offers an interesting collection of ways to extend indoor spaces to outdoor balconies, creating views and framing the landscape. Note the detail of the ‘disappearing’ window frame once the window is open, in the bedroom. Without the hint of a window frame, it gives a sense of complete outdoors.              

AHO – The Scarcity and Creativity Studio

In the aftermath of receiving the Architizer award, I am contemplating how to involve more design and building into teaching. The AHO SCS is an excellent example of such an endeavour. It is not easy to combine practice and academic work, but this and similar work is inspirational!     

2017 Architizer Awards are “a stunning celebration of innovative architecture”

Another building from this year’s Architizer winners, a public building in Japan which stands out for its iconic design that promotes sustainability and a community’s spirit of place. As it is characteristic of Japanese architecture, it is understated yet well thought-out and exquisitely detailed.      

Rural House in Puebla / Comunal Taller de Arquitectura | ArchDaily

A community centre in Mexico, built by the local people in one week. The materials are bricks, bamboo as well as a laminated aluminium corrugated roof, which is made from recycled food containers. The project has an optimum environmental performance, note the sloped thin metallic roof and openings at the top.    

Pho Da Cafe / hausspace

A semi-outdoor cafe in Vietnam is organised in East-West orientation while incorporating the existing tall trees. The typology of semi-outdoor living is found across most of the planet in vernacular architecture, yet very few contemporary structures take advantage of this ancient knowledge.